WHOA.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Autograph quilt, ca. 1856–63
Adeline Harris Sears

Metropolitan Museum of Art

In 1856, seventeen-year-old Adeline Harris, the daughter of a well-to-do Rhode Island mill owner, conceived of a unique quiltmaking project. She sent small diamond-shaped pieces of white silk worldwide to people she esteemed as the most important figures of her day, asking each to sign the silk and return it to her. By the time the signatures were all returned and ready to be stitched into a “tumbling-blocks” patterned quilt, Adeline had amassed an astonishing collection of autographs. Her quilt features the signatures of eight American presidents; luminaries from the worlds of science, religion, and education; heroes of the Civil War; such authors as Charles Dickens and Ralph Waldo Emerson; and an array of prominent artists. Today, the autographs displayed in this beautiful and immaculately constructed quilt provide an intriguing glimpse into the way an educated young woman of the mid-nineteenth century viewed her world.

(via privatethoughtsbetweenherlegs)

beeftony:


There are few things in the world more depressing than the knowledge that a 65 year-old Somali gynecologist has bigger balls than you could ever hope to achieve even if you gave yourself steroid collagen injections to the scrotum every night and set up an induction port that allowed you to inflate them with an air pump like a basketball or those high-top sneakers from the early 90s.
Meet Hawa Abdi. A woman who has never raised her fist in anger against another human being, but also one who could perform three C-sections on dirt-poor women, wash her hands, then go straight outside, stare down an army of gun-toting hardcore fanatical Somali militiamen, and with four words send them running for their lives on a light-speed rainbow of shame and self-loathing without even blinking. A woman once appropriately described once as “one part Mother Teresa, one part Rambo.”
Read the rest at Badass of the Week.

Somebody make a movie about this woman.

beeftony:

There are few things in the world more depressing than the knowledge that a 65 year-old Somali gynecologist has bigger balls than you could ever hope to achieve even if you gave yourself steroid collagen injections to the scrotum every night and set up an induction port that allowed you to inflate them with an air pump like a basketball or those high-top sneakers from the early 90s.

Meet Hawa Abdi. A woman who has never raised her fist in anger against another human being, but also one who could perform three C-sections on dirt-poor women, wash her hands, then go straight outside, stare down an army of gun-toting hardcore fanatical Somali militiamen, and with four words send them running for their lives on a light-speed rainbow of shame and self-loathing without even blinking. A woman once appropriately described once as “one part Mother Teresa, one part Rambo.”

Read the rest at Badass of the Week.

Somebody make a movie about this woman.

(via paraphrasethis)

buxombibliophile:

thedailywhat:

Legitimate Rape Ditty of the Day: Oversized hats, perfect pitch, and a resounding message — the Renegade Raging Grannies have turned out the year’s best video. 

(Not Safe For Work — granny expletives!) 

[death+taxes]

Bless these old ladies.

My grandmother in 1955, showing the boys how it’s done. (“It” being math.)

My grandmother in 1955, showing the boys how it’s done. (“It” being math.)

npr:

vogue:

Carmelita Jeter, Vogue June 2012
Photographed by Bruce Weber
Read the article

“The train wasn’t moving,” but—as Phyllis Posnick is quoted as saying—it has a nice “sense of fantasy.” Isn’t the Olympics where the improbable meets the possible after all? Not that Carmelita Jeter couldn’t outrun a train…—Daisy 

npr:

vogue:

Carmelita Jeter, Vogue June 2012

Photographed by Bruce Weber

Read the article

“The train wasn’t moving,” but—as Phyllis Posnick is quoted as saying—it has a nice “sense of fantasy.” Isn’t the Olympics where the improbable meets the possible after all? Not that Carmelita Jeter couldn’t outrun a train…
—Daisy 

(via privatethoughtsbetweenherlegs)

Prose is closest I’ve ever been to feeling like I found it
I’m not a writer I just drink a lot about it.

I’ve been here before, I know where it goes

heavyinlight:

(And if we’ve come a long way then I suspect it sideways, further from our origin, no closer to our destination)

Respect to them, but why are no men walking out? Like, anywhere?

First, we can’t make medical decisions. And logically, if we can’t make those, we can’t decide finances for our families. Atwood should be required reading for lawmakers. Except it would probably give them ideas for ways to expedite the process.

iammischu:

youcrashstanding:

phdramblings:

thegoddamazon:

cruelyouth:

pantslessprogressive:

Eight female state senators in Georgia walked out of the Senate chambers on Thursday to protest two bills that hinder access to abortion and contraceptives. All eight female democratic senators left the chambers together after two bills they oppose passed the Republican-led Senate. From Atlanta’s WXIA, the legislation:

  • Prohibits state employees from using state health benefits to pay for abortions
  • Does not allow employees of private religious institutions to demand that their insurance policies pay for contraceptives

“We stood together to protest what we feel is absolutely a war on women here in Georgia and we want to sound the alert to Georgians,” said Sen. Nan Orrick.

Republican state senator Joshua McKoon said of the legislation, “What I would say is the war that’s being waged is on a relative minority in this country that has strong beliefs that are protected by the First Amendment.”

The bills now heads to the House, whereboth are expected to pass.

The senators who walked out: Sen. Gloria ButlerSen. Gale Davenport, Sen. Nan Orrock, Sen. Freddie Powell SimsSen. Donzella James, Sen. Miriam Paris, Sen. Valencia Seay and Sen. Horacena Tate. Looks like I’ll be spending my Friday night emailing these senators to thank them for taking a stance on an incredibly important issue.

..did I reblog this already?  Well, doesn’t matter, I’m going to reblog it again…

Look at their faces. They’re furious. Also, why is “War on Women” displayed as a puzzled inquiry? It should go without saying that women are suddenly under attack.

Hey youcrashstanding!  I’m not sure if you’ve seen this or not, but I believe you were looking for the names of the senators who walked out.

I just emailed all of them, thanking them for their courage.

(via iammischu-deactivated20140227)

missvoltairine:

materialworld:

REVOLUTIONARY WOMAN OF THE DAY: Lucy Parsons (circa 1853 – March 7, 1942) was a labor organizer, socialist, and legendary orator. Lucy was of Native American, Black, and Mexican ancestry, born in Texas as a slave. She moved to Chicago where she was a key organizer in the labor movement and also participated in revolutionary activism on behalf of political prisoners, people of color, the homeless, and women. She said, “We [women] are the slaves of slaves. We are exploited more ruthlessly than men.” We salute Lucy Parsons, known by the Chicago Police Department as “more dangerous than a thousand rioters”. Know your revolutionary women’s history.
via REVOLUTIONARY WOMAN OF THE DAY: Lucy Parsons | AF3IRM

always reblog Lucy Parsons.

missvoltairine:

materialworld:

REVOLUTIONARY WOMAN OF THE DAY: Lucy Parsons (circa 1853 – March 7, 1942) was a labor organizer, socialist, and legendary orator. Lucy was of Native American, Black, and Mexican ancestry, born in Texas as a slave. She moved to Chicago where she was a key organizer in the labor movement and also participated in revolutionary activism on behalf of political prisoners, people of color, the homeless, and women. She said, “We [women] are the slaves of slaves. We are exploited more ruthlessly than men.” We salute Lucy Parsons, known by the Chicago Police Department as “more dangerous than a thousand rioters”. Know your revolutionary women’s history.

via REVOLUTIONARY WOMAN OF THE DAY: Lucy Parsons | AF3IRM

always reblog Lucy Parsons.

(via remembertheladies)

todaysdocument:

On February 26, 1939, in a dramatic act of conscience, Eleanor Roosevelt  resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) when it  barred the world-renowned singer Marian Anderson, an African American,  from performing at its Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to Mrs. Henry Roberts, 02/26/1939

todaysdocument:

On February 26, 1939, in a dramatic act of conscience, Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) when it barred the world-renowned singer Marian Anderson, an African American, from performing at its Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to Mrs. Henry Roberts, 02/26/1939

(via npr)

thedailywhat:

Anti-Vasectomy Act of the Day: Lawmakers in Georgia are the latest to hop aboard the prove-a-point legislation train that’s already made stops in Virginia, Oklahoma, and Mississippi.

Georgia Democrats held a hearing today in the state House on an anti-vasectomy bill, which aims to point out the hypocrisy inherent in a majority male legislature restricting the reproduction rights of women.

“Thousands of children are deprived of birth in this state every year because of the lack of state regulation over vasectomies,” bill author Rep. Yasmin Neal (D-Riverdale) said in a statement. “It is patently unfair that men can avoid unwanted fatherhood by presuming that their judgment over such matters is more valid than the judgment of the General Assembly, while women’s ability to decide is constantly up for debate throughout the United States.”

At the heart of the purposely ludicrous protest is House Bill 954, which seeks to criminalize abortions from the point at which “the fetus can sense pain.” According to the legislation’s author, Rep. Doug McKillip (R-Athens), his bill would make abortions illegal seven weeks prior to the limit set by Roe v. Wade.

McKillip took issue with the anti-vasectomy bill, saying it “make[s] light of something as important as protecting life.” House Democratic Leader Stacey Abrams countered that McKillip’s bill is hypocritical.

“If we follow his logic,” she said, “we believe it is the obligation of this General Assembly to assert an equally invasive state interest in the reproductive habits of men and substitute the will of the government over the will of adult men.”

McKillip, formerly a Democrat, made headlines in 2010 for switching parties shortly after being elected chairman of the Democratic caucus.

[jacksonville.]

(via buxombibliophile)