As people who work with youth, we must continually examine our culture and engage with teens to break down these harmful stereotypes. One way to do this is through collection development. Whatever our personal bias, we must actively develop diverse collections, and seek and purchase titles with varying discussions about teenage sexuality How Librarians Can Help Fight the Culture of Slut-Shaming | School Library Journal

(via schoollibraryjournal)

artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Lisa Adams | on Tumblr (Australia)

Lisa Adams creates images that are often unsettling, sometimes melancholy or by turns uplifting, but always affecting and richly atmospheric. The scale on which she works affords her involved and tightly realised paintings an intimacy that echoes the personal nature of her subject matter. Indeed, she explores grand emotions on a humble scale so that the very act of looking at her paintings is a revelatory and ultimately rewarding experience. Adam’s emblematic paintings hold the promise of divested secrets and play with constructions of language through the incorporation of witty titles. (src. QUT Art Museum Public Programs by Alison Kubler, Curator)

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more Lisa Adams | artist found at actegratuit]

herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES

herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES

(via birdie-does-sci-fi)

rachelfershleiser:

After Birth by Elisa Albert

rachelfershleiser:

After Birth by Elisa Albert

You can’t create things and care about feedback. You cannot. You can’t…because nobody wants to tune in just to have someone try to please them. They wanna see a voice. They wanna see you do what you do, and if they think you’re trying to appeal to them…, they know it like that. People are smart, so I think that’s the danger of it. Out of self-preservation, I feel like you can’t look at feedback too much. — Mindy Kaling on how much she pays attention to audience feedback (x)

(via claudiagray)

Snape is a Terrible Friend to Lily: An Essay

kaylapocalypse:

I feel like the story of Snape and Lily via this post needs a muggle twist so some people can get a true understanding of what that was like. And how you should never side with Snape ever and how he was not romantic and his devotion to Lilly was 5,000% icky.

Imagine you are black.

(I mean, I’m black so I don’t have to do much imagining. But if you are not black imagine you are black. Close your eyes real tight. Concentrate.  Okay open them. Get ready for oppression.)

Now imagine that in maybe 5th grade you make friends with a white boy. He’s kind of shy, but you have things in common. No big deal. Whatever. Its like, the 80’s, being friends with someone of another race isn’t a huge fucking deal anymore. Especially in a big city, which is where you live. Whatever man, its 5th grade. 

In your 5th grade class, there is another boy. Everyone has had this boy in their class at some point: Loud, brash, cocky, kind of really popular but in an annoying way, thinks he’s the class clown—or at least he’s good friends with the class clown. (But this is fifth grade, remember, so if you’re in high school and you have something forming in your mind, age that down to about 12 years old and yeah.) Annoying boy is white too. But hey, its America/England so, most people are white. Its not a big deal. 

Annoying boy pretty much won’t leave you alone. Hair pulling, skirt flipping and the like. Its bothersome and you pretty much loathe him. Particularly because, by contrast with your sweet shy friend, annoying boy is rather beastly.

In about a year, shy boy starts getting really into reading stuff about nationalism and conservative politics. You don’t really pay much attention to it because this is 6th grade. Everyone’s going rapidly through interests and hobbies at this stage of their life. Shy boy is still nice to you and that’s all that matters really.

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(via phirephoenix)

I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself than be crowded on a velvet cushion. — from WALDEN by Henry David Thoreau (via vintageanchorbooks)

(via seananmcguire)